Nurturing Parenting Facilitator Training February 19-21, 2019

Participants will learn:          
  • The philosophy of Nurturing Parenting.
  • The five parenting constructs of abuse/neglect.
  • The impact of maltreatment on brain development.
  • How to assess high risk parenting beliefs.
  • To tailor make programs based on family’s needs.
  • To gather process evaluation data.
  • To evaluate pre-post program impact.
  • To implement home, group program models.

Carol Lapin, MSSW, has been teaching, training, and sharing the philosophy and skills of the Nurturing Parenting Programs® for adults, children and adolescents since 1996. In 1998 she received the recognition of Dr. Stephen Bavolek, principal author of the programs, as a National Trainer and Consultant in the Nurturing Parenting Programs®.

Payment Information:

  • For online credit card payment, select the Register Online blue button.  Include all participant names and personal contact information in the Contact Information field.  We ask all participants to also download the Nurturing Parenting Facilitator Training form and send completed form to [email protected].
  • For mail in payments, we ask all participants to download the Nurturing Parenting Facilitator Training form and mail completed form with payment to:

Family Nurturing Center
Attn:  Carol Lapin
8275 Ewing Blvd.
Florence, KY  41042

 

No refunds within one week prior to training date.  There will be a $25 cancellation fee per registrant.

WHO:

Conducted by Carol Lapin, MSSW
National Trainer/Consultant of Nurturing Parenting Programs

WHEN:

February 19-21, 2019

WHERE:

Vineyard Church Northwest
9165 Round Top Road
Cincinnati, OH 45251

REGISTER:

Even if you are paying by credit card online, please also download the Nurturing Parenting Facilitator Training form for all participants and send to [email protected].

Register Online

COST:

$350 per person

Training is equivalent to 15 CEUs by the Kentucky and Ohio Board of Social Work.

Brink for a Cause – Playground Build

Join us June 12th at Brink Brewing for Brink for a Cause to support our Playground Build. Make sure to bring the flyer or show it on your phone to ensure that your beer purchase supports our Every Day Heroes Playground Build.

See you there!!

Brink Brewing
5905 Hamilton Avenue
Cincinnati, OH

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Brink for a Cause 324.32 KB 3 downloads

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Spring 2018 Issue of Nurture

 

Read about the Every Day Heroes who have chosen to be champions for children through their words and action in our spring issue of ‘Nurture’.

Our hero staff who worked through the holidays to help relocate our Cincinnati office location.  The hundreds of heroes who attended our Blue Ribbon Ceremony and promote April as Child Abuse Prevention Month through education and awareness efforts.  Our hero volunteers who are working on the Blue Ribbon Bash scheduled for August 24th, and our hero friends who raised funds to support Family Nurturing Center’s mission to end the cycle of child abuse.

We invite you to read about these heroes and learn how you too can be a hero for children.  Thank you!

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Spring 2018 Newsletter 8.56 MB 49 downloads

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Blue Ribbon Bash 2019

It’s BIG. It’s BLUE, and it was a BASH! 

Thank you to everyone who joined us for the Blue Ribbon Bash.  We are beyond excited and humbled by the generosity we received and can proudly announce that thanks to our guests and corporate sponsors, we raised $112,000 to support our mission to end the cycle of child abuse!

Photos taken at the Bash are now available for FREE DOWNLOAD.  Enjoy!!

Family Nurturing Center is also thankful to Kick Lee for joining us as our featured speaker and showing guests how we can all be advocates for children and families.  The water droplets that guests wrote personal messages on to help fill the bucket for our clients will be turned into large displays in both our KY and Oh locations.

We also want to thank Ellen M. Katz, President and CEO of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation for her years of leadership supporting causes that impact children and families.

Blue Ribbon Bash Evening Program

Sponsors

Many thanks to our corporate sponsors for their belief in our mission to end the cycle of child abuse.

Presenting Sponsor

Talking to a Child Who Has Been Abused

One thing that many people do not know about abused children is that they often love the person who is hurting them. This is very hard to believe but it is true. This happens because the person who is abusing them is often someone they know well and trust a lot. Children are therefore hesitant to reveal that they are being abused because they fear that they will get the person into trouble if they do so. Another reason for children not wanting to disclose abuse is that many times they have been frightened or threatened by the abuser.

The children in your care love and trust you. A child who has been abused may start talking to you about it. He may do so because he trusts you and wants to share the burden he is carrying with you. Hearing a child talking about being abused is very difficult. You may react in different ways. Your reaction is very important to the child. If you react with disgust or don’t believe what he is saying, he may stop talking to you about it. He will feel that you don’t trust him. This will prevent him from getting help. It also prevents the abuse from stopping.

Be very sensitive and listen carefully when a child is talking to you about abuse. Keep in mind that it is very difficult for the child to talk about being abused. This is especially hard for children who have been sexually abused. The child has gathered up all her courage to tell you about the abuse. How you handle the conversation will determine how you will be able to help the child.

Keep the following considerations in mind when talking to a child who is disclosing abuse:

  • Help the child feel comfortable. Talking about abuse is not easy for the child. Respect the child’s privacy and talk to him in a quiet and private place. The place should be familiar to the child. This will help the child feel comfortable.
  • Reassure the child that it is not her fault. Most children who are abused feel, or are told by their abusers, that they are to blame for their own abuse. It is very important to tell the child that she is not guilty and that she is not responsible for the abuse. Let them know that they have not done anything wrong.
  • Don’t react with shock, anger, disgust. Your reaction to that the child tells you is very important to the child. He will be watching your reaction closely. Be calm. When you react with disgust or anger, he will not feel comfortable talking to you anymore. He may also feel scared and confused. This will prevent you from acting promptly and getting help immediately.
  • Don’t force a child to talk. Give the child time. Let her talk to you at her own pace. If the child is unwilling to talk or seems uncomfortable, don’t pressurize her to do so. If the child seems uncomfortable when talking about certain specific things, don’t press her for details. You can change the topic to something that the child is more comfortable talking about.
  • Don’t force a child to show injuries. If the child is willing to show you his injuries, you may allow him to do so. However, when a child is unwilling to show you his injuries, you may not insist that he do so. Also, you cannot insist that a child take off his clothing so that you can see his injuries.
  • Use terms and language that the child can understand. If the child says something that you don’t understand, like a word for a body part, ask the child to explain or to point to the body part. Don’t correct or make fun of the words the child is using. When you use the same words as the child does, it helps the child feel less confused and more relaxed. The child will feel that you understand him.
  • Don’t ‘interview’ the child. The purpose of your discussion with the child is to gather enough information so that you can make an informed report to the local CPS agency or to your supervisor. When you have the information you need, you must stop the discussion. Don’t try to prove that abuse has happened.
  • Ask appropriate questions. The questions that you ask the child must be appropriately worded. Choose your language carefully. This ensures that you get correct information from the child. For example, if you see a bruise on a child and you suspect that it is the result of abuse, you may say to the child, “That looks painful. Do you want to tell me how you got it” or “Do you want to talk about that bruise you have”. It would be inappropriate to say, “Did you get that bruise when someone hit you?” Remember that you can do more harm by supplying a child with words and ideas. Let the child tell her own story and give you the answers.
  • Don’t ask ‘why’ questions. Why questions like, “Why did he hit you?” or “Why she do that?” will only confuse a child more. Remember that children who are abused often do not understand why it is happening. These types of questions will force them to think about the reasons for the abuse. ‘Why’ questions also will not give you any helpful information.
  • Don’t teach the child new terms or words. Don’t teach the child new words or give her new ideas. This is harmful. When you do this, you are biasing the child. Also, when you teach a child a new term or word, you are changing the child’s original disclosure. This is important in relation to the court and law.
  • Find out what the child wants from you. A child may ask you to promise not to tell anyone. He may ask you to take him home with you. He may ask you what you are going to do. It is good to know what the child is expecting from you. This will help you in deciding what your course of action should be.
  • Be honest with the child. Let the child know what you are going to do. This will build trust. Be honest about what you can do for him. Don’t promise him things that cannot be done. For example- let him know that you may have to tell someone so that he will not be hurt anymore. Then he will not be surprised or afraid when he finds out that someone knows.
  • Confirm the child’s feelings. Let the child know that it is okay to feel scared, hurt, confused or angry.
  • Be supportive. Let the child know that you are glad she told you about the abuse. Let her know that you believe her and that you care about her. Some children may think that you will not like them anymore because of what they told you. Assure her that you are still her friend.
  • Remember: the safety of the child is most important. Be sensitive to and aware of the child’s safety. Keep in mind that a child might be further abused if he reports that he has spoken to someone about the abuse. If you feel that the child is in danger, you must contact CPS immediately.

By, Saraswathy Ramamoorthy with Judith A. Myers-Walls, Ph.D., CFLE.  Provider Parent Partnerships www.extension.purdue.edu

Nurturing Father’s Facilitator Training May 22-24

Participants will learn:          
  • The philosophy of Nurturing Parenting.
  • The five parenting constructs of abuse/neglect.
  • The impact of maltreatment on brain development.
  • How to assess high risk parenting beliefs.
  • To tailor make programs based on family’s needs.
  • To gather process evaluation data.
  • To evaluate pre-post program impact.
  • To implement home, group program models.

Carol Lapin, MSSW, has been teaching, training, and sharing the philosophy and skills of the Nurturing Parenting Programs® for adults, children and adolescents since 1996. In 1998 she received the recognition of Dr. Stephen Bavolek, principal author of the programs, as a National Trainer and Consultant in the Nurturing Parenting Programs®.

In 2010 Carol received the recognition from Mark Perlman, principal author of the Nurturing Father’s Program as a Certified Consultant and Trainer. She has implemented the Nurturing Father’s Curriculum in Northern Kentucky.

Mail completed form and payment to:

Family Nurturing Center
Attn:  Carol Lapin
8275 Ewing Blvd.
Florence, KY, 41042

On line registrants, please submit a completed registration form to [email protected].  When paying on line, please note billing page information to also list your participant name(s). Thank you.

No refunds within one week prior to training date.  There will be a $25 cancelation fee per registrant.

WHO:

Conducted by Carol Lapin, MSSW
National Trainer/Consultant of Nurturing Parenting Programs

WHEN:

May 22-24, 2017

WHERE:

1324 Madison Avenue

Covington, KY  41011

REGISTER:

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Register Online

COST:

$300 per person

Training is equivalent to 15 CEUs by the Kentucky and Ohio Board of Social Work.

Build a Blue Ribbon Tree for Kids

Blue Ribbon Trees are growing all over Greater Cincinnati. We invite every community, school, church, business to take action for children by simply  “Building a Blue Ribbon Tree”.  Trees should be displayed during the entire month of April indoor or outdoors.  Take a picture of your tree and send to Family Nurturing Center for inclusion in our Tree Registry.

You can also plant a Pinwheels for Prevention garden.  Pinwheels can be ordered from Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky.

Learn how to Build a Blue Ribbon Tree with Preschool Children:

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View All the Blue Tree Ribbon Photos

View stream on flickr